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Everything Old is New Again: Antiques and Vintage Stores in Elizabeth City »

Everything Old is New Again: Antiques and Vintage Stores in Elizabeth City
Antiques and vintage items have history and often, a great story attached to their provenance. From their sometimes less-than-perfect but charming details to the stellar workmanship they boast, antiques transport us to bygone eras. Fortunately for residents of Elizabeth City, there are a number of great retail options available for those who want to round out an existing collection or find the perfect, one-of-a-kind collectible. Jennifer and Rick Ladich, owners of Coppersmith Antiques & Auction Company (123 S. Hughes Blvd., 252-331-5814), have sold antiques and vintage items for the past 25 years. Within their large space filled with furniture, glassware and porcelain from the 18th century to the mid-century decades of the 1950s and ‘60s, the Ladichs offer appraisal services and auction and estate sale services, as well. They also rent booths to dealers, which has created an antiques mall under one roof. While Rick has been interested in antiques his entire life and purchased his first collection (glass bottles) at age 12, Jennifer’s curiosity about them piqued after meeting Rick 18 years ago. With her newfound knowledge, she purchased a “unique, turn-of-the-century oak china closet with lion heads carved into it.” Allow yourself the time to browse here because there’s a lot to see including Persian rugs, stained glass light pendants, a Heywood Wakefield dining set and fireplace mantles.   “We re-purpose and upscale previously loved items,” explains Karen Cameron, owner of Funked Up Junk (302 Mill St., 757-328-8697) which she runs with her husband, Casey.  With a creative eye and an artistic hand, they combine everyday items and re-purpose them into something that may be completely different than the item’s originally intended use. A vintage headboard and footboard, for example, are cut, reconfigured, and freshly painted and now serve as a funky bench.  The store, located in the old Millworks Shop, has wonderful character and is a stylish backdrop for their unique inventory. With this expansive room, Karen and Casey have been able to house a showroom and a consignment area where others sell their own creative pieces or odds-and-ends to customers interested in trying their hand at making a one-of-a-kind piece.  So much imagination is at work here so have a look, purchase a finished piece, or perhaps combine a few pieces to create something that is distinctively yours.   Upon entering The Treasure Hunter (112 N. Road St., 252-722-6078), one is struck by the vast array of items in display cases, on tables and in cabinets. Owned by Milton and Angel Sawyer, the inventory ranges from gold and silver to collectibles from the 1700s to the 1980s to vintage metal signage and gas pumps to home furnishings. The Sawyers also offer appraisal and consignment services and buy “entire estates outright.” Milton, who has sold antiques for the past 30 years, started buying stamps and coins at age seven with his father. His first independent deal, at age 13, marked “the true beginning of his business” and with a $100 loan from his father, he purchased a comic book collection and made $2500. He still loves vintage comic books and old baseball cards and “really anything old and interesting and rare because there’s a story in all of it.” One display case in the store bears several sets of whimsical mid-century ceramic salt and pepper shakers and at the rear of the store is a rad collection of vinyl albums by The Doors, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin and Creedence Clearwater Revival, amongst hundreds of others. And your eye is certain to catch the items that win the award for Most Unusual Collectibles: bottles containing preserved black scorpions.   Twice Is Nice (102 E. Main St. and 106 N. Road St., 252-619-9185 or 252-619-3395), owned by Sherry and Jeffrey Waff, has a mix of antique and vintage items including collectibles, glass, housewares and furniture and also offers appraisal services. ‘Project pieces’ are also sold that allow the buyer to re-purpose or refinish them to their liking. The shop, which is comprised of connected rooms, has inventory that allows you to channel your inner Peggy Olson with a set of mid-century modern nesting tables, a collection of 1960s frosted Tom Collins glasses featuring scenes from the old south and a 1950s wood telephone chair with a lyre back. If modern baroque is more to your liking, a tufted red velvet wing chair paired with a black and red velvet Duncan Phyfe sofa fits the bill. And for an advance warning about storms on the horizon, a 1950s barometer from West Germany will become a trusted forecaster.   For anyone renovating a historic house, The Jack Frost-Johnson Architectural Salvage Store (504 Hughes Blvd., 252-340-1106) operated by the Elizabeth City Historical Neighborhood Association (ECHNA), is an invaluable resource. Store director Rick Boyd notes that most of the inventory comes from houses and commercial buildings that date from the 1880s through the 1940s. From mouldings, beadboard and trim to old windows and old doors, this store services customers who are looking for replacement items that match the period and integrity of their homes. Store proceeds support the supply of free walking tour pamphlets that can be picked up around the city, restoration seminars, and a working classroom where local residents learn how to make repairs in their homes. Notable items recently spotted in the store’s inventory include a pair of 1940s stoves with warming trays and never-used globe lights from the 1950s.   The Framery & Antiques (406 A-2 Griffin St., 252-335-1803) offers an impressive collection of Fostoria glassware. The boutique, which opened in 1998 and is owned by Mary Ann and Gene Scott, has a bit of everything including jewelry, silver, textiles, pottery and furniture from the late 1800s to the 1960s. With mentors that include her former office manager, Jane, and her friend, Neal Williams, Mary Ann became interested in antiques while residing in Alabama in the late 1960s and still has her first purchase: a Blenko glass vase that’s 30 inches tall. Citing her love of tiger oak furniture, she prefers to carry pieces that “have been well-used and well-loved with the original patina and good bones, not the prissy stuff” and believes antiques and vintage pieces enhance any décor. The store’s pewter tableware, brass hurricanes, American Drew cherry silverware chest and James Adams Floating Theatre settee will make the incorporation of antiques into contemporary rooms a breeze.   The bi-level Tina Clancy’s Art and Antique Connection (116 N. Poindexter St., 252-339-3868), which opened in 2012, is chock-full of Depression glass, vintage china and furniture including Eastlake, Duncan Phyfe, Victorian and mid-century modern pieces. Tina, who is the sole proprietor of the business, began collecting privately 20 years ago, with her first vintage purchase of “a beautiful German hutch from 1910,” and views the local antiques community as “very knowledgeable” with “excellent people who are always willing to help and answer questions.”  With a great appreciation for custom built furniture, especially “very rustic pieces from the mid-1800s constructed from solid wood with the use of dowels or square nails that are one-of-a-kind,” she sells these as well as fine veneer pieces. Tina believes in mixing wood types and eras, as is reflected in the room vignettes dotted around the store that are... READ MORE »

Shop & Stay the Weekend in Elizabeth City! »

Shop & Stay the Weekend in Elizabeth City!
Elizabeth City has wonderful options for all your shopping needs. Come for a weekend to pick out the perfect gifts for the upcoming holiday season. From big spenders to savvy savers, shoppers are sure to find perfect additions for the homes of family and friends. Here are just a few local options to browse around town: Paradise Treasures– Looking for chic options for an experienced shopper? Visit Paradise Treasures to find clothing, accessories and more for that special woman in your life. Shoppers are sure to find statement pieces and luxury items to accentuate the stress-free lifestyle. And let’s not forget—shoes for days!   Funked Up Junk– With a name as unique as its offerings, Funked Up Junk is a great little place to pick out “upcycled” furniture and decorations. By giving antiques a new look, the store offers re-purposed items styled with a coastal vibe. Browse the main building or take a peak at the booths next door.   Clown ‘N’ Around– Specializing in jewelry, gifts and home décor, Clown ‘N’ Around is your one-stop-shop for designing your home with themed accents. In addition to offering items like collegiate apparel, this place is one of the only independently owned stores in town to offer party supplies. Order balloons to make your upcoming celebration even more special.   Be sure to visit the shopping section on our website for a complete list of stores. For trip ideas, browse the Things to Do section and Calendar so that you can fully #DiscoverECity! Rebecca Hansen graduated from East Carolina University with a B.S. in communication, concentrating in public relations and film studies and with an M.S. in public relations from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. Rebecca has worked with companies such as Bath & Body Works and The Walt Disney Company. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram at @RebeccaHansenPR  ... READ MORE »

Everything Old is New Again: Antiques and Vintage Stores in Elizabeth City (Part 2) »

Everything Old is New Again: Antiques and Vintage Stores in Elizabeth City (Part 2)
    For anyone renovating a historic house, The Jack Frost-Johnson Architectural Salvage Store (504 Hughes Blvd., 252-340-1106) operated by the Elizabeth City Historical Neighborhood Association (ECHNA), is an invaluable resource. Store director Rick Boyd notes that most of the inventory comes from houses and commercial buildings that date from the 1880s through the 1940s. From mouldings, beadboard and trim to old windows and old doors, this store services customers who are looking for replacement items that match the period and integrity of their homes. Store proceeds support the supply of free walking tour pamphlets that can be picked up around the city, restoration seminars, and a working classroom where local residents learn how to make repairs in their homes. Notable items recently spotted in the store’s inventory include a pair of 1940s stoves with warming trays and never-used globe lights from the 1950s.   The Framery & Antiques (406 A-2 Griffin St., 252-335-1803) offers an impressive collection of Fostoria glassware. The boutique, which opened in 1998 and is owned by Mary Ann and Gene Scott, has a bit of everything including jewelry, silver, textiles, pottery and furniture from the late 1800s to the 1960s. With mentors that include her former office manager, Jane, and her friend, Neal Williams, Mary Ann became interested in antiques while residing in Alabama in the late 1960s and still has her first purchase: a Blenko glass vase that’s 30 inches tall. Citing her love of tiger oak furniture, she prefers to carry pieces that “have been well-used and well-loved with the original patina and good bones, not the prissy stuff” and believes antiques and vintage pieces enhance any décor. The store’s pewter tableware, brass hurricanes, American Drew cherry silverware chest and James Adams Floating Theatre settee will make the incorporation of antiques into contemporary rooms a breeze.   The bi-level Tina Clancy’s Art and Antique Connection (116 N. Poindexter St., 252-339-3868), which opened in 2012, is chock-full of Depression glass, vintage china and furniture including Eastlake, Duncan Phyfe, Victorian and mid-century modern pieces. Tina, who is the sole proprietor of the business, began collecting privately 20 years ago, with her first vintage purchase of “a beautiful German hutch from 1910,” and views the local antiques community as “very knowledgeable” with “excellent people who are always willing to help and answer questions.”  With a great appreciation for custom built furniture, especially “very rustic pieces from the mid-1800s constructed from solid wood with the use of dowels or square nails that are one-of-a-kind,” she sells these as well as fine veneer pieces. Tina believes in mixing wood types and eras, as is reflected in the room vignettes dotted around the store that are full of personality. Take your time meandering through the various rooms and aisles to see a Japanese-inspired cabinet with brass butterfly hinges, ornate mirrors, silver Art Deco tea services and a Queen Anne highboy. Read Everything Old is New Again: Antiques and Vintage Stores in Elizabeth City (Part 1)   Simone Cooper is a publicist and branding specialist who is also a mid-century modern fanatic. When she’s not assisting clients with messaging, you can find her hunting for furniture and housewares from the 1960s.     Liza Franco captures the moments of life that will one day be someone’s memories and links for generations to come.  Her work includes, lifestyle, commercial, fine art and portrait photography.... READ MORE »

Everything Old is New Again: Antiques and Vintage Stores in Elizabeth City (Part 1) »

Everything Old is New Again:  Antiques and Vintage Stores in Elizabeth City (Part 1)
Antiques and vintage items have history and often, a great story attached to their provenance. From their sometimes less-than-perfect but charming details to the stellar workmanship they boast, antiques transport us to bygone eras. Fortunately for residents of Elizabeth City, there are a number of great retail options available for those who want to round out an existing collection or find the perfect, one-of-a-kind collectible. Jennifer and Rick Ladich, owners of Coppersmith Antiques & Auction Company (123 S. Hughes Blvd., 252-331-5814), have sold antiques and vintage items for the past 25 years. Within their large space filled with furniture, glassware and porcelain from the 18th century to the mid-century decades of the 1950s and ‘60s, the Ladichs offer appraisal services and auction and estate sale services, as well. They also rent booths to dealers, which has created an antiques mall under one roof. While Rick has been interested in antiques his entire life and purchased his first collection (glass bottles) at age 12, Jennifer’s curiosity about them piqued after meeting Rick 18 years ago. With her newfound knowledge, she purchased a “unique, turn-of-the-century oak china closet with lion heads carved into it.” Allow yourself the time to browse here because there’s a lot to see including Persian rugs, stained glass light pendants, a Heywood Wakefield dining set and fireplace mantles.   Self-described ‘buffet hoarder’ Kim Metcalf, owner of Junk n Pretties, along with her husband, Chad, (100 S. Main St., 252-305-4811), sells vintage items and antiques that she says are “fun and gorgeous.” With a love of wood furniture from all eras, Kim has been selling antiques for more than 10 years and also offers custom painting for “good old pieces of furniture that are a mess.” Finding inspiration from several places: her grandmother’s house, furniture and old canning jars, her mother-in-law, friends who taught her about antiques, and her first vintage purchase, a suitcase, which was the catalyst for her “current addiction,” Kim’s advice for antiques novices is to “buy old things that make you smile.” Vintage sideboards, dressers, commodes, cabinets, and buffets (naturally) abound here.   Upon entering The Treasure Hunter (112 N. Road St., 252-722-6078), one is struck by the vast array of items in display cases, on tables and in cabinets. Owned by Milton and Angel Sawyer, the inventory ranges from gold and silver to collectibles from the 1700s to the 1980s to vintage metal signage and gas pumps to home furnishings. The Sawyers also offer appraisal and consignment services and buy “entire estates outright.” Milton, who has sold antiques for the past 30 years, started buying stamps and coins at age seven with his father. His first independent deal, at age 13, marked “the true beginning of his business” and with a $100 loan from his father, he purchased a comic book collection and made $2500. He still loves vintage comic books and old baseball cards and “really anything old and interesting and rare because there’s a story in all of it.” One display case in the store bears several sets of whimsical mid-century ceramic salt and pepper shakers and at the rear of the store is a rad collection of vinyl albums by The Doors, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin and Creedence Clearwater Revival, amongst hundreds of others. And your eye is certain to catch the items that win the award for Most Unusual Collectibles: bottles containing preserved black scorpions.   Twice Is Nice (102 E. Main St. and 106 N. Road St., 252-619-9185 or 252-619-3395), owned by Sherry and Jeffrey Waff, has a mix of antique and vintage items including collectibles, glass, housewares and furniture and also offers appraisal services. ‘Project pieces’ are also sold that allow the buyer to re-purpose or refinish them to their liking. The shop, which is comprised of connected rooms, has inventory that allows you to channel your inner Peggy Olson with a set of mid-century modern nesting tables, a collection of 1960s frosted Tom Collins glasses featuring scenes from the old south and a 1950s wood telephone chair with a lyre back. If modern baroque is more to your liking, a tufted red velvet wing chair paired with a black and red velvet Duncan Phyfe sofa fits the bill. And for an advance warning about storms on the horizon, a 1950s barometer from West Germany will become a trusted forecaster.   Read Everything Old is New Again: Antiques & Vintage Stores in Elizabeth City (Part 2)   Simone Cooper is a publicist and branding specialist who is also a mid-century modern fanatic. When she’s not assisting clients with messaging, you can find her hunting for furniture and housewares from the 1960s.     Liza Franco captures the moments of life that will one day be someone’s memories and links for generations to come.  Her work includes, lifestyle, commercial, fine art and portrait... READ MORE »

Get Your Fresh Fruits and Veggies! »

Get Your Fresh Fruits and Veggies!
The opening of the Downtown Waterfront Market is a harbinger of good times to come on Elizabeth City’s waterfront. The 2016 market season opens May 7, and over the next four months, local farmers, food purveyors and artisans will gather each Saturday on the green at Mariners’ Wharf to sell peas, radishes, lettuces, asparagus and strawberries for springtime meals, and blueberries, tomatoes, squash, string beans, corn and okra later in the summer. “The market is as good for the vendors as it is for local shoppers,” said Market Coordinator Courtney Birdsall. “There are very few small farms and business people who prepare fresh foods, so to support them makes a huge difference to their livelihoods.” Billed as a “vine-ripened, just-picked, fresh-made good time,” the market draws about 25-30 vendors each week, selling not only homegrown produce, but baked and canned foods, plants, flowers and arts and crafts. Market goers can also hear live music and see cooking demos throughout the season. The Downtown Waterfront Market is open Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. through the end of October. Check their Facebook page to see what’s fresh each... READ MORE »

Small Saturday + Art for the Masses = Great Deals, Good Times! »

Small Saturday + Art for the Masses = Great Deals, Good Times!
We have two amazing reasons to head to Elizabeth City on Saturday, Nov. 28. First, it’s Small Business Saturday. Held the Saturday after Thanksgiving, between Black Friday and Cyber Monday, the annual promotion encourages seasonal shoppers to patronize businesses that are small and local. In Elizabeth City, we have dozens of fabulous shops that fit the bill, offering original artwork, eclectic home décor and furnishings, to jewelry, apparel and artisan-made wares. Second reason to visit: Art for the Masses, also Nov. 28, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the old Super 10 Store on Main Street. Presented by Arts of the Albemarle, this is a juried show of local artists who are selling their original, quality artwork at affordable prices just in time for the holidays. No item will be more than $200, so this is a great chance to purchase a masterpiece for someone you love (or for yourself!). And when you’ve worked up an appetite from all that shopping, be sure to stop in one of Elizabeth City’s charming independently-owned restaurants for coffee, lunch or dinner. Supporting local businesses is a great way to embrace the spirit of the season! Our downtown friends and neighbors look forward to seeing you Nov.... READ MORE »

Heritage Crafts a Hallmark of Albemarle Craftman’s Fair »

Heritage Crafts a Hallmark of Albemarle Craftman’s Fair
Don’t let the name mislead; you wont’ find pom-pom pets or Popsicle houses at the Albemarle Craftsman’s Fair. The long-running show, Oct. 23-25 at the Knobbs Creek Recreation Center in Elizabeth City, is a showcase of traditional heritage crafts expertly designed and lovingly made by first-class artisans. This marks the fair’s 57th year. We were curious about the show’s history and participants, so we posed a few questions to Elizabeth City craftswoman Lisa Winslow, who is this year’s treasurer and publicity chairwoman. Who can participate in the Craftman’s Fair?  You must be a member of the Albemarle Craftsman’s Guild to participate in the fair, but anyone who is a quality craftsman can have their work juried in February or May of any year. If accepted into the Guild you may have a booth in the fair from then on without further jurying. There are no geographical limits to membership, but the jurying process is extensive just to make sure that we carry on the tradition of quality craftsmanship. As a craftsman’s guild, we do not allow art. How did the fair begin?  The fair began in 1959 as a way for hobbyists, especially women at that time, to be able to contribute to the family income. Many of the crafts they made were household items such as brooms, quilts, wrought iron, etc. What can visitors expect to see this year?  We have a packed house again this year with everything from jewelry to furniture and all categories in between. We also have some very interesting crafts that we haven’t had in a while such as a leatherwork, and there will be pottery artists, weavers, metal craftsmen and many more who will be participating for their first time. How long have you been a crafter and what do you create?  This will be my 26th year and I am a fiber artist. I hand-dye silk scarves and also create wool felted items. This year I will be focusing on a nature theme with my felted birdhouses and needle felted animals and creations What do you enjoy most about this event?  I enjoy the welcoming spirit of the craftsmen family, but I most enjoy the educational aspect of the fair. To see the excitement of craftsmen who genuinely love their craft and enjoy sharing the process. Part of our motto is to teach. Without that many crafts would be lost. You will see pottery wheels turning, weavers weaving and scroll saws sawing, as craftsmen inspire fair-goers to learn a new craft and carry on the tradition. The group’s facebook page has details of the show, along with late-breaking news about the attending artisans. Check it out at... READ MORE »

March, March, March to First Friday ArtWalk »

March, March, March to First Friday ArtWalk
Join us downtown for another evening of art and fun this Friday, March 6 from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. That’s right–it’s First Friday ArtWalk! Several downtown businesses and galleries will be open late to feature artists from around our area for your enjoyment. Come out and bring the whole family, and then stay for dinner at one of our great downtown restaurants! Here is what you will find in Downtown Elizabeth City on Friday: Serenity Studio Arts will feature local artist Dale Corbin with his original abstract acrylic paintings. Also on display, paintings from Museum of the Albemarle’s  Paint & Cookie art class. Footprint Christian Resources will host Robin Price, author of ” UNDRESS HIM. ” Positively inspiring, thought provoking and engaging for the 21st century woman.” One of her T-Shirts will be given free of charge with the purchase of her book. Ms. Price is also planning to have a Puzzle Match. Shay Leslie Boutique will showcase Clarence Munden, featuring ” My Morning Walks” mobiles and windchimes crafted from sea glass, fulgulrite, shells and other blessings from the sea. Arts of the Albemarle’s Jenkins’ Gallery will have Ryan Fox. Plus, Stan Akins’ returns with his Turkish Rug Show. In the 516 Gallery are works by Susan Tobey White, and Donna Sneed is the featured jewelry artist Port Discover’s “1st Friday Kids Art-In,” 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Studio 51 will have artist Paul Dudley Bishop and writer/publisher Charlotte Dickens, sharing a featured space showcasing their art and poetic publications in the gallery. Indulge in the crock pot with unstuffed cabbage. Free make-and-take atc swap upstairs in the loft! Center Cross Homespun Goods will feature local artist Lovett T. Smith’s artwork in Giclee. Two and a Half Women to showcase Debbie Lawrence, The Golden Cowgirl, with her hand-painted, one-of-a-kind furniture. Page After Page Bookstore featuring Harbor Glass & Fine Tobacco jewelry. Be sure to ask for your ArtWalk punch card! If you visit at least seven of the open businesses and have them punch your card with their designated hole punchers, you will be entered for a door prize drawing valued at $25-$50. First Friday is always a fun night out. Join us, won’t... READ MORE »

Friends of Downtown »

Consider becoming a “Friend of Downtown” Elizabeth City. We value your interest in and support of a better quality of life in our downtown community! Elizabeth City Downtown, Inc. (ECDI) has been a member of the North Carolina Main Street Program since 1988.  For the past 26 years, our Downtown Organization has proudly worked to revitalize our downtown district following the four points of the Main Street approach to revitalization: Organization, Design, Promotion and Economic Restructuring.  We even have earned National Accreditation with the Main Street Program for the past three years in a row! ECDI is always working to improve the environment for the success of our property owners and small business owners and to be a centralized welcoming location for all of our community to gather to play, shop, dine, do business and stay.  ECDI’s vision remains that “Downtown Elizabeth City and its waterfront will be a premier destination for unique shopping, dining and cultural events, continuing to enhance Elizabeth City’s legacy as the “Harbor of Hospitality”.” Some of the projects and events ECDI was involved in recently include the Grand Illumination and Holiday Celebration; Mariner’s Wharf Film Festival; new trash receptacles for downtown; co-sponsoring educational workshops for businesses; free downtown Wi-Fi; vacant building window displays; First Friday Art Walk, the Jump-Start Business Incentive program; and the Award-winning North Carolina Potato Festival expanding to three days and drawing about 30,000 attendees! With your support as a “Friend of Downtown” for as little as $25, we can continue producing successful downtown special events, improving the appearance of our historic buildings and streetscapes, enhance the environment for business success, and strengthen our local economy. Working together we can make a difference in our downtown – the heart of our city! For more information call (252) 338-4104 or email: elizabethcitydowntown@embarqmail.com... READ MORE »